Food of Mongolia

Food of Mongolia: Top 10 Dishes of Mongolia

4 months ago

Food and drink deliver lifelong memories that define the experience of a holiday or travel. The most significant aspect of traveling is seeking out the local cuisine. It is through food that we learn about the people and culture of any country. So, if you plan to visit the beautiful country Mongolia, the food of magnolia is the must-know thing for you.

The food of Mongolia is largely derived from ethnic Mongolian traditions. It is a combination of their nomadic diet and northern Chinese and Russian influences. The Mongolian traditional diet consists of food that comes from the five domestic animals: cow, goat, sheep, horse, and camel since Mongolian culture is based on cattle farming. Mongolians never slaughter young animals. Mutton, particularly the back section, is considered to be the best meat for Mongolian dishes. For special occasions, a whole sheep is traditionally prepared by Mongolians.

 Let’s know about top 10 dishes of Mongolia

Byaslag

Byaslag is a mild cheese made with yak or cow’s milk. Kefir is typically used to separate the curd from the milk. The curd then gets covered in a cloth after draining and forced between wooden boards with weights.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

The cheese is then formed into squares, cut into slices, and freshly eaten as a snack, while the hard variety of cheese is eaten with tea or soups. This cheese is pale yellow in color, have a strong texture, salty, mild, and creamy in flavor. Guests and visitors are often offered this dish of Mongolia, but it is particularly popular at weddings.

Khorkhog

Khorkhog is a traditional barbecue dish of Mongolia which is prepared with heated stones in large milk jugs. In the pots, the meat and the stones are placed, and the water is then added to produce steam that cooks the meat. Khorkhog is commonly made with bone-in cuts of mutton, lamb, or goat meat, as well as vegetables like cabbage, onions, potatoes, and carrots. The Mongolian dish is supposed to be eaten by hand, and in restaurants, it is rarely found. This food of Mongolia is usually made by nomadic families of the Mongolian countryside.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Khuushuur

Khuushuur is a Mongolian savory pastry that is usually filled with a mixture of onions and ground mutton, but there are a few filling variations of, vegetables, beef, garlic, or peppers. This deep-fried, crescent-shaped pastry dish of Mongolia is intended to be eaten by hand. Khuushuur is served in local restaurants as well as you can enjoy this dish on the streets of Mongolia where four pieces of khuushuur along with lettuce or pickles are usually included in the order.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Tsuivan

Tsuivan is a noodle dish of Mongolia that is typically prepared with mutton and different vegetables. The noodles are usually made by hand and are steamed with diced meat and vegetables cooked together. People sometimes substitute mutton with various options like beef, horse, and camel meat, while onions, peppers, cabbage, carrots, or potatoes are usually included in the vegetables used in the dish. This Mongolian dish is famous throughout the country. The freshly prepared Tsuivan sprinkled with green onion is best served.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Bantan

Bantan is a popular Mongolian soup sometimes used as a treatment for a hangover. It is made up of water, sliced spring onions, lamb pieces, and wheat flour crumbs. While the soup is typically garnished with chopped spring onions, different herbs, and spices, as a result of its smooth, dense, and soft texture, Bantan is often compared to Korean beef porridge.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Bansh

Bansh is tightly wrapped Mongolian dumplings that are boiled in water with a pinch of salt. The dough is usually made with wheat flour, water, and salt, while the filling consists of ground beef or mutton, garlic, onions, herbs, and spices. When the dumplings float to the top, they are ready and can be eaten in milk tea or soups. This Mongolian mouth-watering dish is normally served with side condiments as a separate dish.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Boodog

Usually made with the whole goat, Boodog is a typical Mongolian roast filled with hot stones, potatoes, and onions which are cooked with the meat. Apart from goats, whole marmots may also be used to prepare the roast. The stones with smooth, circular surfaces go into the upper legs, while the larger ones are put in the cavity of the abdomen.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

The animal’s neck is bounded by a piece of wire. When all of the skin surfaces start leaking fat, Boodog is cooked. This nomadic dish can be found throughout Mongolia, although a more refined take on Boodog is also served by many Ulan Bator restaurants.

Borts

Borts is one of the famous dishes of Mongolia that consists of dried meat from cows, goats, and camels. This dish was invented as a means of preserving meat for the long winter season. First, the meat is cut into long, thick strips and then hung on a rope to dry until a slightly brownish color form. It is broken into smaller pieces when it’s ready and can be kept for months, or even years.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

Kumis

Kumis is a fermented dairy product that originated in ancient Mongolia, but it has spread through Central Asia over time. The drink is similar to kefir, but it is usually made from raw milk of the mare, which contains more sugar than the milk of the goat or cow, and is also high in protein and vitamin. Because of the high amount of sugar in the milk of the mare, when it is fermented, kumis has higher alcohol content than kefir. Kumis becomes an araka or arkhi if distilled into the spirit. Kumis has a slightly acidic taste and an aftertaste of almonds is also there in this light-bodied milk drink.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

It is usually served chilled in small cups, known as piyala, in Kyrgyzstan and Mongolia. Kumis is normally drunk, like medication because of its health benefits.

Buuz

Buuz is a traditional steamed dumpling dish of Mongolia that is filled with meat such as beef or mutton. Usually, salt, onions, garlic, and fresh herbs are also seasoned with the beef. The dumplings are prepared in large quantities and consumed throughout the year, but during Tsagaan Sar, the Mongolian New Year celebration that usually takes place in February, Buuz is the most popular dish of Mongolia.

Dishes of Mongolia | Food of Mongolia
Dishes of Mongolia

This dish of Mongolia is mostly eaten by hand. The dumplings are usually served as the side dish with fried bread, dipping sauces, and salads, although mixing them with drinks such as vodka or tea is recommended.

Ankit Jain

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